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WIRED@wired

Where tomorrow is realized.

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WIRED

This beautiful surreal collage of pristine woodlands overlaid by garishly lighted urban phantasmagoria was all created in-camera rather than in Photoshop. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Photographer Christoffer Relander grew up in the Finnish countryside, near the small town of Ekenäs, and his photos reflect the natural motifs of his youth: trees, flowering plants, birds, wolves. But his latest series, which uses multiple exposures to juxtapose Scandinavian forests with Hong Kong street scenes, brings in visuals far removed from his homeland. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ First, Relander shot Finnish and Swedish forests at night, using variously colored strobes to light up the trees. Then he spent a week in Hong Kong searching for the perfect locations to complement the background images. Relander chose the city for its famously trippy neon signs, which are fast disappearing thanks to new government regulations that call for more energy-efficient LED signs. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Click the link in our bio to learn more about his process and to see more of his stunning photos. 📸 Christoffer Relander |   @christ_of_ferrelander  


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WIRED

On June 27, the Hubble Space Telescope pointed toward Jupiter and captured this spot-on shot of the planet and its shrinking Great Red Spot. Jupiter is known for the colorful bands that wrap around it and we can see them here clearly, even as bending and arching storms develop within them. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Click the link in our bio to see more beautiful space photos. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 📸 NASA, ESA/A. Simon/M.H. Wong


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WIRED

In 1958, a Czech-born sociology professor named Nat Mendelsohn purchased 82,000 acres of land in the Mojave Desert, about 100 miles north of Los Angeles, and founded the optimistically named California City. Intended to eventually rival LA in importance, California City was just one of the countless master-planned communities that sprouted up across the state in the post-World War II boom years. But unlike Irvine or Mission Viejo, California City never took off. - Although it's officially California's third-largest city based on its geographic size, today just under 15,000 people live there, many of them employed at the California City Correctional Center. All that remains of Mendelsohn's Ozymandian vision is a sprawling grid of empty, mostly unpaved streets carved into the desert landscape—a ghost suburb that looks from above like the remains of an ancient civilization. - Click the link in our bio to learn more about this "city" and to see more haunting images. 📸 Noritaka Minami


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WIRED

Subscribe to WIRED. Only big ideas. Provocative stories that will forever change how you think. Get 12 months of unlimited access to wired.com for just $10, plus a free WIRED webcam cover! Link in bio for details. Questions? Call 1-800-SOWIRED or email WIRcustserv  @cdsfulfillment.com.  


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WIRED

This year Tower Bridge, London's engineering marvel, turned 125. - When it opened in 1894, London's Tower Bridge was hailed as a triumph of Victorian engineering. It was the largest and most sophisticated overpass of its kind in the world, using hydraulic steam engines to raise and lower the two bridge sections (known as bascules, from the French for "see-saw") to allow ships to pass through. The elevated, open-air walkway that gives the bridge its distinctive profile allowed pedestrians to cross the Thames when the bridge was raised. The bridge's architects concealed the structure's high-tech engineering by cladding the steel infrastructure in Cornish granite and Portland stone to match its namesake, the nearby Tower of London. - Today, Tower Bridge is better known for its iconic Victorian Gothic architecture than its engineering. An electro-hydraulic drive system has long since replaced the original steam engines; the bridge can now be raised with not much more than the push of a button. Fortunately, much of the bridge's original infrastructure has been preserved. - Click the link in our bio to see more beautiful images. - 📸 Harry Cory Wright |   @harrycorywright  


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WIRED

Apocalypse later. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ A comic by   @ellisjrosen  , with   @collectcartoons.   Get more of our comics by clicking the link in our bio.


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WIRED

The security reputation of iOS, once considered the world's most hardened mainstream operating system, has taken a beating over the past month: Half a dozen interactionless attacks that could take over iPhones without a click were revealed at the Black Hat security conference. Another five iOS exploit chains were exposed in malicious websites that took over scores of victim devices. Zero-day exploit brokers are complaining that hackers are glutting the market with iOS attacks, reducing the prices they command. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ he recent stumbles suggest it's time for the company to go beyond fixing the individual security flaws that have made those iPhone attacks possible, and to instead examine the deeper issues in iOS that have produced those abundant bugs. According to iOS-focused security researchers, that means taking a hard look at two key inroads into an iPhone's internals: Safari and iMessage. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ While vulnerabilities in those apps offer only an initial foothold into an iOS device—a hacker still has to find other bugs that allow them to penetrate deeper into the phone's operating system—those surface-level flaws have nonetheless helped to make the recent spate of iOS attacks possible. Apple declined to comment on the record. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ "If you want to compromise an iPhone, these are the best ways to do it," says independent security researcher Linus Henze of the two apps. Henze gained notoriety as an Apple hacker after revealing a macOS vulnerability known as KeySteal earlier this year. He and other iOS researchers argue that when it comes to the security of both iMessage and WebKit—the browser engine that serves as the foundation not just of Safari but all iOS browsers—iOS suffers from Apple's preference for its own code above that of other companies. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Click the link in our bio to learn more about what security researchers are saying. 🎨   @elacey_creative  


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WIRED

Researchers have detected water vapor in the atmosphere of a “super-Earth” planet outside our solar system. The planet is twice the size of Earth, eight times as massive, and is now the most habitable exoplanet we've found. - This is the first time water has been detected in the atmosphere of an exoplanet that is not a gas giant. The planet, known by the catchy name K2-18b, is 110 light-years away and orbits a red dwarf star about half the size of the Sun. It orbits its host star once every 33 days. “This is the only planet outside the solar system that has the correct temperature to support water and has an atmosphere that has water in it, making this planet the best candidate for habitability that we know right now,” says Angelos Tsiaras, an astronomer at University College London and the lead author of the study published today in 'Nature Astronomy.' - A planet’s atmosphere holds many tantalizing clues. It can help determine if there are oceans on the surface, or if there’s a surface at all. It can tell you about a planet’s structure and evolution. And it can reveal whether a planet is capable of sustaining life. In this case, the data suggests that K2-18b either has a dense rocky core and a thick atmosphere, like Neptune, or is covered in a planet-wide ocean. The detection of water vapor in the atmosphere of K2-18b brings some clarity to this exoplanet, but like any big discovery, the data raised more questions than it answered. Go to the link in the bio for the full story on whether K2-18b could be viable host for life. 🎨: World History Archive// Alamy // Elena Lacey |   @elacey_creative  


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WIRED

This isn't a scene from 'Inception.' Aydın Büyüktaş uses a drone, 3-D rendering, and Photoshop to create a warped view of the world. - Click the link in our bio to see more of his stunning shots and learn how he makes them. 📸 Aydın Büyüktaş |   @aydinbuyuktas  


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WIRED

Meet the latest iPhone. Apple didn't just debut the iPhone 11 today, it all also showed off the iPhone 11 Pro. Apple’s newest phone starts at $999, has 5.8-inch and 6.5-inch options, and comes with not one, not two, but three lenses. 📸📸📸The three lenses are the 12MP wide-angle, 12MP ultra-wide angle, and 12MP telephoto and the camera shoots nine images, many of them before you even press the shutter, and optimizes at a pixel level to optimize the outcome. - The iPhone 11 has two cameras but at a price of just $699. On the other end of the spectrum is the new iPhone 11 Pro Max, which also has three lenses, starts at $1,099, and is supposed to have 5 five more hours of battery life than the iPhone Xs. All three phones are available for preorder Friday at 5 am Pacific, and all of their displays will have Apple's trademark notch cutout up top, which holds a selfie camera and the sensors needed for Face ID. - Does your phone’s camera matter that much to you? Apple clearly thinks so. Go to the link in our bio for more on why these newest phones are all about the camera. 📽️: Apple


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🎵 I get by with a little help from my friends. 🎵 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ These fish are tagging along with a giant manta ray in Ecuador. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Click the link in our bio to learn more about why and to see more photos. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 📸 Andrea Marshall |   @queenofmantas  


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WIRED

Yes, this is actually a place on our planet. 🤯 Captured by   @dailyoverview  , this is Sossusvlei, which translates to "dead-end marsh." It's a salt and clay pan located on the edge of the Namib Desert in Namibia, and those reddish squiggly lines you're looking at are among the tallest sand dunes in the world. In fact, many of them are more than 656 feet (200 meters) tall. Go to   @dailyoverview   for more awesome aerials like this. 📸: Created by   @benjaminrgrant   | Source imagery from:   @maxartechnologies  


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